Advise and Resources

The National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition (HMHB), issued a position statement asserting that “oral health care during pregnancy is crucial and should be available to all women, regardless of income level”. HMHB is committed to “working with dental and other health care providers to increase awareness of, and support research on, the possible link between periodontal disease and pre-term, low birth-weight babies” (18)

The American Academy of Periodontology has developed a draft policy statement that recommends pregnant women have a periodontal examination performed and appropriate preventive and/or therapeutic services provided, as there is emerging evidence that women with periodontal disease may be more at risk to deliver a preterm low birth weight baby. Consumer and media information are posted on the web at: http://www.perio.org/consumer/pregnancy.htm

Clinical guidelines suggest that routine plaque and calculus removal via polishing, scaling and curettage can be performed safely during pregnancy, regardless of trimester (19) but the most conservative approach saves dental treatment for the second and early third trimester. Dentists and obstetricians agree that routine dental care should be maintained throughout pregnancy(20,21). However, despite the growing evidence and literature to support the association between periodontal disease and PLBW, this recommendation has not been widely translated into clinical or public policies and pregnant women and their obstetricians have noted that many dentists are hesitant about caring for pregnant women.

Medicaid Dental Coverage for Children, Mothers, and Pregnant Women

Medicaid programs, administered by the states within federal guidelines, are required to provide certain populations with specified (“mandatory”) benefits. Dental is only mandated under Early and Periodic, Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment Services Program ( EPSDT) and is therefore available to pregnant adolescents but not typically to pregnant women over 21. Pregnant women over age 21 who are in Medicaid therefore can only access dental benefits in states that elect to provide it (22). As the federal and state governments seek Medicaid cuts, elective dental services have been susceptible to termination. As of 2005, only 6 states provided reasonably comprehensive dental benefits to adults while others provide emergency treatment or no dental benefit at all.

California: first in the nation to extend dental benefits to pregnant women


Pregnant women over age 21 in California are eligible for limited adult dental coverage including periodontal treatment (23) Louisiana and Utah have also extended Medicaid dental coverage to pregnant women. Additional states are considering adding this benefit in the hope of reducing the burden of periodontal disease and, perhaps, PLBW, in their populations.

 

 

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3 records found. Showing page 1 of 1.

DATE: 10/10/2015 12:56:38 PM ... SCREEN NAME: Open
Many people give the money ecuxse but then do go on big trips, get their nails done, hair done, etc. Ultimately that's about priorities and what's important to them it's difficult to convince without sounding like you're out for their pocket book, sometimes. Anyway, we've had a patient with a large perio abscess with exudate and sub calculus about 8-9 mm down the distal root requiring perio surgery (basically a huge vertical bony defect), and she was adamant that we put veneers on her two front teeth first (btw, they looked completely fine and didn't need anything) and no amount of convincing from any of the staff, including the doctor, could get her to change her mind. I'm not sure what's been done yet. Anyway, great video.
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DATE: 8/14/2012 1:25:34 AM ... SCREEN NAME: Julie
I had regular cleanings until 2 yrs ago and then I missed for 2 years because I didn't have insurance. Well, now pregnant and covered by medicaid I suddenly have periodontis and guess what!? Medicaid doesn't even cover the cost of scaling or the deep clean! So, basically I'm pregnant and my husband is jobless and now they tell me I have to pay $800 for the cleaning and maitnience because there are 6mm pockets of bacteria in my mouth. It's terrible. Once I found out I was pregnant I couldn't dontate plasma anymore and now I'm totally screwed because the medicaid changed their coverage :(
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DATE: 12/6/2011 8:58:14 AM ... SCREEN NAME: dkc
im a young women that is do in 24 days and have had problems with my teeth i wish some one would have told me about this. not even my dr. told me
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